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Posts Tagged ‘healthy’

(Or, how I found mine after years of illness) 

As a busy homeopath and mother, I understand how precious of a commodity time is for all of us.   After detours, mistakes, and years of searching for the healthiest ways of living, I’ve distilled my research and time-tested tips to a simple seventeen. Here are my top all-time favorites.

 

1)      Stay calm. The world is not as scary a place as the media and other self-serving entities might lead us to believe. When I am anxious or worried I repeat a passage from Psalm 46:10, “Be still and know that I am God.”  To know that God is protecting all of us, gives me inner peace.  No matter who you believe God to be, pray or meditate daily. If you’re Catholic, say your rosary. If you’re Protestant, read your Bible. If you’re Jewish, study your teachings. Don’t miss out on the importance of faith.

 

2)     Don’t watch TV or spend unproductive time on the internet. After working in the field of media, I learned that it is not in your best interest to be subjected to most forms of media as a steady diet. Protect your children from the barrage as well.

 

3)     Eat like your great-grandparents did. Eat whole, real, and unprocessed foods. Make your meals yourself from single, basic ingredients. It takes longer, but the rewards are worth the effort. There is something therapeutic about chopping fresh vegetables and creating soup from homemade bone stock. And you’ll earn a reputation as a good cook!

 

4)     Learn enough homeopathy to be able to treat yourself and your family for life’s little unknowns. The more you know, the more you’ll want to know. Homeopathy is timeless and enduring. At the very least, find yourself a credentialed, experienced homeopath and use his/her services liberally.

 

5)     Stay away from conventional medications as much as possible. Most meds are dangerous and at best superfluous. Every dubious drug has a healthy counterpart either in homeopathy, in food,  or in an herb (My CD “Homeopathy First Aid: Perform in the Storm” is available on my website).  Learn the safe alternatives and use them with confidence.  Save the use of modern drugs for life-threatening situations only.

 

6)     Get fresh air and direct sunshine at least 30 minutes daily. Throw out the sunscreen. Have you read the ingredients? Sun screen inhibits your body’s natural mechanism to make Vitamin D and is loaded with chemicals not meant to be slathered on the skin. Instead, if needed, protect your skin the old-fashioned way: a hat, cover-up, and common sense.

 

7)     Get some exercise. I realize how trite this statement sounds, but after years of resisting exercise myself because of time constraints, I’ve come to learn that I’m more productive and happier when I work out. Even a short walk is good enough.

 

8)    If possible, keep a garden and animals. A flower or vegetable garden can be a sight for emotionally sore eyes.  A pet can bring a smile to your face. They keep us closer to what is important in life: simple pleasures.

9)     Protect your family and the integrity of the family in our society. That means your marriage and the marriages of those around you. A unified family is the basis of a healthy, prosperous and creative society.

 

10) Keep your exposure to electromagnetic fields to a minimum. Use the speaker function on your cell phone instead of holding it up to your ear.

 

11)  Expose yourself and family to the intelligent, creative, and lofty influences of our society. By listening to classical music, reading fine literature, viewing fine art, we are inspired to greatness ourselves. Then emulate and study those who have led successful and creative lives: Mother Teresa, Benjamin Franklin, Gandhi, Churchill, and Beethoven.

 

12) Keep family traditions.  Whether they’re based on your religion or created by you, they are important for carrying family into the next generation.  If you don’t have any or enough, the way to establish them is by repeating a meaningful activity, time and again.

 

13) Eat and drink raw dairy products from animals that are pasture fed and preferably organic such as raw sheep’s milk cheese from Italy, raw goat and cow’s milk from France, Denmark, Ireland, and sometimes the United States.

 

14) Eat organic. At least as much as possible, buy or grow your own vegetables and eat meat from pasture fed animals. In other words, support local, organic, family farms.  Your liver will thank you too.

 

15)  Include some fermented food or drink with every meal. Old fashioned sauerkraut, pickles, yogurt, kefir, kombucha, fermented carrots, and so on. They provide live enzymes that help us break down the cooked foods we eat. They are excellent for intestinal disorders and are utilized by the healthiest people on the earth.

 

16) Try to eat raw food at least 80% of the time.   This is not as difficult as one would imagine: drink raw milk, eat fermented and fresh vegetables, dehydrated nuts and seeds,  and incorporate raw yogurt, cheese and butter into your diet.

 

17)  Do good work. Prepare your food and nurse your family with pride. Whatever it is you choose to do, do it with aplomb, commitment and joy.

 

These are the tips that have helped me and my family live lives full of vitality and vigor.  What tips have you discovered to maintain your own good health?

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________These are just a few of my tips for vibrant health.  Lots more on my website homeopathyworks.net.  Check out this link to read many more of my articles.  Or call (716) 941-1045 to schedule a free 15 minute phone consultation to see how homeopathy could fit with your health strategy.

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“Anyone who tells a lie has not a pure heart, and cannot make a good soup.”

Leave it to the great Beethoven to mix morality with soup. (A tall order for his distressed servants, no doubt!)

Allow me to be “pure-hearted” here and share a recipe that represents a key nutritional foundation with a symphony of possibilities. This soup base is the foundation of every well prepared soup imaginable. Plus, it is free of MSG and preservatives that flavor many store-bought broths and soups.

I start with roasted bones and end with a gorgeous stock.  I find that the most delicious and nourishing stocks are those made from a variety of bones, so plan to save your roast chicken, roast beef, pork, lamb, buffalo and rabbit.

Here’s what else you’ll need:

4 lbs (approximately) of bones (carcass, head, feet, cartilage, antlers, etc)

4 or more quarts cold, filtered water

½ cup vinegar, distilled or raw

2 apples, halved

3 onions, halved

3 celery stalks, halved

3 carrots, halved

Several sprigs of fresh thyme

1 tsp dried green peppercorns, crushed (optional)

1 bunch parsley (optional)

Once your roast has been served, add approximately 4 quarts of water to the roasting pan and scrape the bottom to infuse the drippings into the mix. Toss in any additional bones, heads, feet, etc. and add the remaining ingredients. Be sure that the bones are covered. If not, add more water.

I like to include apples and onions because they impart a sweeter aroma to a stock that might smell gamey otherwise. Vinegar is necessary to draw out the calcium, magnesium and zinc from the bones and render the bone stock more nutritious.

Then, set the pot to simmer for 12-72 hours. Skim off the scum and discard. The pot can remain on the flames for an entire 72 hours or turned off nightly, left at room temperature and reignited in the morning. Once strained, the stock can be frozen.

While it’s still on the stove, this stock can be used as a base for a myriad of soups.  You might find that the stock doesn’t have a particularly appealing aroma but it will taste delicious after it’s strained and used to cook with.

With this base, you can offer “medicine in a bowl” in tandem with the other, family-pleasing meals you serve day after day.


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I’ve made a little discovery.  I can make crackers in infinite flavors and with a myriad of ingredients.  They can be high or low carb, gluten free or include lots o’ gluten. They can be savory when I add cheese and olives, or sweet like graham crackers when I use a touch of cinnamon and maple syrup. And since I realized how easy they are to make, I’ve been making crackers nearly every night for the last few weeks.

I think it’s my new hobby.

Now, when someone asks me “So other than being a homeopath, what do you do for fun?  I say “I’m a cracker-head.”

Familiarizing myself with the components of a cracker was the first step.   I learned that crackers are forgiving.  You can add just about any nut, bean or grain flour with some flavoring, add a liquid, roll out and bake and you’ve got something on which to serve cheese or to spread almond butter.   Last week I added Pecorino cheese, cracked pepper and chopped garlic.

They were Italian crackers.

Then one night, I added rosemary from my garden, melted coconut oil as part of the liquid and tons of shredded coconut.

These were herb crackers.

When I included cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and chopped almonds they tasted like Dutch Windmill Cookies (Speculaas).

Heavenly.

‘Don’t have tapioca flour?  No problem, just use more almond flour.  ‘No gelatin?  Don’t worry, skip it.  ‘Don’t like poppy seeds?  It’s ok.  Just add sesame seeds instead.

The only caution I found to be noteworthy, is that you don’t want to use too much liquid or they’ll stick to your rolling pin.   It’s hard to say exactly how much is just the right amount without knowing if you’ll be using coconut, almond flour or such. Each has its own idiosyncrasies and they require adjusting for more liquid or less.  So, I learned to eye ball it.  A mealy type consistency is the best so that the dough can roll out easily.

But again, crackers are forgiving.

So, if you add too much liquid, just toss more dry into the bowl until it feels as though it will roll out nicely.

Yummy Gluten Free, Low-Carb Crackers

Preheat oven to 250°

  • 1 cup coconut flour
  • ½ cup tapioca flour
  • 1 cup almond flour or meal
  • 1 cup flax meal
  • 2 cups coconut flakes
  • ½ cup poppy seeds
  • ¼ cup gelatin
  • Celtic Salt, to taste
  • About 2 ½ -3 ½ cups liquid ( water, lemon juice or  yogurt whey)

In a mixer, or a large bowl, combine the dry ingredients.  Add the liquid and mix until mealy.

Roll out the mixture between 2 pieces of parchment paper. Until it’s 1/8” thick or less.

Peel off the top layer of parchment paper and place the batter layer still on the parchment paper onto a cookie sheet.  You want the parchment to be underneath the dough directly on the cookie sheet.  Score the dough into the shape of crackers.

Bake until slightly golden, then flip, allowing the paper to release, so that the crackers are now directly on the cookie sheet.

Bake until crisp. Depending on the amount of liquid and type of flour, it may take up to an hour or so until they’re crunchy.

I keep mine in a glass container with a tight plastic lid in the pantry.  So far they’ve stayed fresh, but I think that’s because my family eats them so quickly that they haven’t a chance to get old.

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This lovely recipe is based on the flourless cakes that have become so popular in high-end restaurants.  (See my Chocolate Buttercream Frosting Recipe below!) It is rich, satisfying and doesn’t seem like a substitute cake at all.  It’s become my family’s favorite birthday cake.

The main ingredient may surprise you.

Beans!

­Here’s what you do:

Soak 2 cups dry of white beans overnight in double the amount of water.

Next day, rinse well and cook until tender.

(You might have a little more than 2 cups once they’ve been hydrated and cooked, but only use 2 cups.)

Cool to room temperature and add the following to a food processor and puree well:

  • 2 cups cooked beans  (use white for vanilla)
  • 6 eggs
  • 3/4 cup maple syrup or sucanat
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Add:

  • 1/4 cup slightly warm coconut oil (so that it is liquid)
  • 1/3 cup sifted coconut flour
  • 1/2 tsp Celtic  salt
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 ½ tsp baking powder

Puree again

Pour into spring form pan, lined with unbleached parchment paper, well oiled with butter or coconut oil.

Bake at 325 degrees for about 30 minutes. I like to check to see if it’s done by inserting a toothpick into the middle. If it comes out mostly clean, it’s done.

(Cupcakes take about 20-22 minutes)

Chocolate Butter Cream Frosting

In a food processor add the following:

  • 2 tsp  raw honey (more, if you like a sweeter frosting)
  • ½ cup almond butter
  • 1 stick butter, room temperature
  • 5 tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1 organic egg yolk (Be sure to wash the outside of the shell with hot soapy water) The addition of  an egg yolk offers live enzymes and gives the frosting a little gloss

When the cake has fully cooled, smooth on the frosting. Keep refrigerated.

Enjoy!

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Kvass. It might be new to the store shelves, but it’s actually an age-old beverage, hailing from Russia and it’s lip-smacking good.

Years ago, I discovered Kvass (Russian for “leaven”) and it definitely raises the bar. Here’s a drink that takes the simplest ingredients and transforms them into a refreshing drink, but what’s more, a healing elixir, too. All starting with bread and water, or beets and salt.

With a simple fermentation process involving sourdough or sourdough rye bread, glucuronic acid is produced. If you’ve never hear of this-don’t worry. All you need to know is that your liver makes this acid, too.  It gathers up toxins and poisons and evicts them from your body.

So, after a glass of Kvass, your body gets a boost of glucuronic acid and can really accelerate the detoxification process.

It’s typically flavored with fruits, such as apples and raspberries or vegetables like beets. I highly recommend you add it to your shopping list or better yet-make it yourself and follow in ancient footsteps when you craft and enjoy this detoxifying drink.

To our health! Or as the Russians say, “На здоровье!”

Here’s a great recipe to try from Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions (page 595):

You’ll need:

  • 4-5 slices whole grain sourdough bread
  • 2 quarts filtered water
  • ¼ cup whey
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • ½ cup raisins
  • 2 apples, peeled and quartered

“Place bread in warm oven until dried out. Place in a large bowl. Bring water to a boil and pour over bread. Let cool before adding sale and whey. Cover and leave at room temperature for 2-3 days. Remove bread and strain into a 2-quart container. Add raisins and apples, cover tightly and store in refrigerator for about 1 month before drinking. Kvass is ready when the fruit floats-a sign that sufficient lactic acid has been produced.”

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Enjoy old favorites gluten-free

With 1 in 133 in the U.S. affected with celiac disease[1], it’s not too surprising that gluten-free diets are popular these days. But people with Celiac’s disease aren’t the only ones who benefit from gluten-free fare.  Did you know, it’s been estimated that 97% of Americans who have Celiac’s disease are not diagnosed?[2]

Many people are completely unaware that they have gluten intolerances and end up experiencing years of discomfort (in mild cases) and much worse, in others.

I like to challenge many of my clients to go gluten free for 30 days and find out whether or not gluten is the culprit responsible for their health dilemmas.

Why don’t you take the challenge, too?

In the process, you’ll discover new ways to make old favorites as well as creative alternatives. Perhaps you’ll realize that you’re better off gluten, as many already have.

Let me get you started! Check out my gluten-free pancakes and banana bread recipes.  Or how about pizza with an almond flour crust? A simple bread or a festive almond cranberry loaf are good options, too.

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Can you think of anything worse than the thought of pinworms?  Because pinworms are a common childhood infection, regrettably, they’re prevalent  in schools, too.

Consider this your first lesson in homeopathy.

Homeopathy is a method of medicine that has the gentle and powerful ability to deal with easily spread infections, such as pin worms and colds.

Let’s look at two homeopathic remedies that have a reputation of protecting teachers (and students) who’ve been exposed to these common childhood sicknesses.

When the classroom epidemic is pinworms, there is a great little remedy that is reputed to be just as powerful, not only to eliminate them, but which can be used as a prophylactic.

(Remember, the alternative is not a pleasant one. Conventional medicine will suggest a medicine that is a vermicide.  The suffix “cide” means to kill.  This means that the active ingredient is a pesticide of sorts, which kills the worms. We want to get rid of the worms, but not at the expense of harming the body with a vermicide.)

Instead, the remedy Cina creates an unfriendly environment so that the worms will expel themselves.  Cina tincture can be used by taking 6 drops in water, then sipping the water throughout the day for 15 days in a row.  It should be repeated one month later in the same manner. This is the advice of practicing homeopaths of India where this kind of infestations is even more prevalent than in the U.S.

Homeopathy has helped many teachers from getting contaminated with this insidious infection even when nearly the entire class is affected.

For colds, my favorite remedy for our family is Oscillococcinum.  In France, it is the top selling, over-the-counter medicine of any kind.  They use it as the premiere remedy to abort a cold or flu before it comes on or before it comes on in full force.  The French take it as a preventative as soon as the first student begins to sniffle and then one day each week for a month, then one day each month until the cold season is over.

Plenty of other Europeans and Americans use it too.

That’s because the protection it offers can be significant, as long as it’s taken before the symptoms get a foothold.  Oscillococcinum is reputed to be particularly valuable when the colds and flu’s come about during the wet and cold seasons, such as autumn and spring.  Some say it’s infallible.

All of these remedies are available at health food stores and many pharmacies and will cost no more than $15.  Additionally, homeopathy will not interfere with any meds you may already be taking.

If you find that your health is too often plagued by the latest illness in school, give homeopathy a try.  It may even become the discovery you innovate in your next science class.

Pinworms and Colds; Who Needs Them? Protect Yourself, Teachers is solely intended to provide a format in assisting the student in learning the principles of Homeopathy.   It is in no way to be considered a substitute for a consultation with a health professional.

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